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Indigenous art works on the move

Helping Australians connect with Indigenous art is behind the launch of an unique display set to tour the country and delight audiences nationwide.

The installation now at the Perth Cultural Centre features artworks from past winners of the Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award (NATSIAA), Australia’s most prestigious Indigenous art award, which is held annually at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT).

Renowned Indigenous curator and Head of Programming at the Sydney Opera House, Rhoda Roberts, is responsible for the creative direction of the installations project which is embarking on a national tour following its official opening in Perth this week.

“At its heart, Indigenous art is about storytelling and bringing people together, and this project is about taking art beyond the gallery walls to locations where more people can enjoy it and be inspired by it,” she said.

“These installations will see Indigenous art out in the open, taking it back to its roots.”

The artists exhibiting their work at these installations include Michael Nelson Tjakamarra (inaugural NATSIAA winner in 1984 who is known for his traditional dot and circle Desert sand painting), Brook Andrew (a contemporary artist who produces visually unique mixed media work), Laurie Nilsen (who depicts cultural and political concerns through barbed wire sculptures) and various artists who created Larrakitj (10 male and female artists from Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre who have worldwide reputation for excellence).

Telstra Area General Manager Boyd Brown said the installations celebrate a 25 year milestone with MAGNT.

“Indigenous art is one of the most powerful forms of storytelling; telling the stories of who we are, how we lived and how we connect,” he said.

The installations are open in Perth now and will then head to Brisbane (7-9 July), Melbourne (13 – 15 July) and Sydney (19-21 July).

 

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